Java and Tapioca

Past Saturday (2009-09-19), I was fortunate to speak at the Café com Tapioca.
This year, the event was celebrating 7 years of the CEJUG, Java User Group from Ceará. One of the most active tech groups in Brasil. Those guys did a great job organizing the event.
It was a sunny day, but instead of going to the beach, many people attended the many lectures of the day. In this post I’ll comment on each of them.
Roughly translated to English (all lectures were done in Portuguese), the lectures were:

“The path of productivity for web developers” by Bruno Pereira – Concrete Solutions.

Bruno knows what he is talking about in this presentation. The path for web development is far from clear at this moment and developers need to open their minds now, and explore different possibilities and technologies.
Firebug is definitely a divisor of waters in web development.
The format of the presentation was not very interactive, but I think it would be very hard to show code and be more interactive with so many technologies being addressed. The topic is plenty for a full day on itself just to get you started.

“How to build a JEE/JME application for the 4 corners of the world.” by Régis Melo – Sagarana.

Régis presented his company and main product to the audience. I thought it was interesting to see that the travelling salesman problem can still be sold as a product, and that ILOG has not completely dominated this market.
He also spoke about some of the challenges of exporting software he faced, some similar to what we see here at the company. Brasil’s potential for software is really underestimated.
If we were to set our minds to it, I think India would be in a bad position to compete with us. The similar timezone to the US certainly helps.

“The myth of the agile teams” by Victor Oliveira – Concrete Solutions.

My presentation, below, would perhaps be best enjoyed by managers, and I think maybe not the best presentation for the public present. The local crowd at FA7 was younger, and mostly team members.
The goal was to create knowledge that supporting teamwork needs hard work too. Organizations have to think seriously on what is necessary to nurture teams and make them better and real teams.

“10 bad habits of JSF developers” by Tarso Bessa and Rafael Pontes – Triad Works

This presentation was very technical and really for people that know, and like JSF. Of course, as Bruno’s presentation pointed out, JSF itself is kind of a disappointment. I remember when Microsoft released .NET that JSF was going to be a huge blow in favor of Java technologies for web development. That was around 9 or 8 years ago.
Many years later, the path is unclear with many independent frameworks fighting for space. (Ruby, Rails, Grails, Django, etc) What is certain is that JSF is a good productivity framework, but has a very limited space for its application. After Oracle’s purchase of Sun, JSF’s future looks gray.

“Improving your application with Lucene: get to know Solr and Hibernate Search” by Paulo Jeveaux – Giran

Jeveaux’s presentation was of one of my favorite open source tools in the market. Back in 2004 when I first worked with it I was already impressed, and the evolution with Solr and Hibernate Search only adds to the package.
If you know nothing about Lucene, it is worth your time.

“What killed RUP can kill Agile” by Rodrigo Yoshima – Aspercom

Having worked with RUP for around 7 years, I know how RUP was misinterpreted, especially during the 90’s in Brasil.
The topic presented is important, very important for any software maker that is interested in being better at it. The possible fall of the Agile movement due to it’s misuse or misinterpretation is a clear and present danger. Something I also addressed in my own presentation considering the team aspect of it.
I do think, however, that the separation between just being pragmatic or conservative does not address the change of view that happened once the Takeuchi and Nonaka’s article was in place. In my view, the “theoretical view” from a process control perspective changed the way we viewed what happened before.
Of course, 50 minutes needs a pragmatic approach:-), and the presentation had a good sweet spot.

“Desmystifying TDD in Practice” by Paulo Silveira – Caelum

Silveira’s nervous style of presenting is very engaging and was my favorite presentation. Using a simple TDD example with very simple business rules (stock market) got people eager to participate. It was certainly interactive and fun.
I love TDD ever since I used it for the very first time a couple of years ago. People who have not tried it, really tried it, don’t know what they are missing.

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